The Role of Parents in Homework Help: What They Can Do To Make It Easier

Parents have a lot on their plates. Between working and being the primary caregiver, it’s not easy to find time for everything. Homework can be a source of stress for many parents. It may seem impossible to keep up with the work while balancing other obligations. But there are ways to make this less stressful for you and your children.

1) Have a set time each day where your child does his or her homework.

2) Offer rewards for completing tasks, such as an extra hour of screen time or a favorite snack after they finish their work.

3) Checking frequently with your child about what they learned that day; ask them about what they’re doing and why they’re doing it.

The Role of Parents in Homework Help: What They Can Do To Make It Easier Parents have a lot on their plates. Between working and being the primary caregiver, it’s not easy to find time for everything. Homework can be a source of stress for many parents. It may seem impossible to keep up with the work while balancing other obligations. But there are ways to make this less stressful for you and your children. 1) Have a set time each day where your child does his or her homework. 2) Offer rewards for completing tasks, such as an extra hour of screen time or a favorite snack after they finish their work. 3) Checking frequently with your child about what they learned that day; ask them about what they're doing and why they're doing it. What parents can do to help their child with his or her homework From a parent’s point of view, homework is a time-suck, a source of stress and frustration, and sometimes a source of arguments between the parent and child. But when parents can acknowledge the need to break the cycle and adopt some of these tactics, it can help them be a little less exhausted and In the long run, the children will reap the benefits. 1) Schedule a set time each day where your child does his or her homework. 2) Offer rewards for completing tasks, such as an extra hour of screen time or a favorite snack after they finish their work. 3) Checking frequently with your child about what they learned that day; ask them about what they're doing and why they're doing it. How to be friends with your kids? 4) No matter how busy you are, set aside some time to spend with your children on the weekends. Make an effort to play with them, or have them spend time with you while you make dinner or do other household chores. 5) Make time for meaningful conversations. Let your children know that you love them and that you want to spend time with them. These tips can be extremely helpful when you’re trying to help your children with their homework. Be sure to speak with a professional if you’re having difficulties managing your schedule. There’s a balance to be found between homework and life. More Ways Parents Can Help Homework Sometimes it’s hard to make homework enjoyable, especially if you’re always stressed about it. Why your kid is annoyed with you? Not all homework assignments are created equally. Some tasks will take very little time to complete while others will be more complex. When children are doing work that is beyond their current ability level, parents need to be patient and firm. Ensure that your child isn't under any pressure to accomplish too much and too soon. Many kids resist asking their parents for help," says Mahoney. And if your child is struggling with their homework, instead of picking apart their schoolwork and harshly criticizing their work, consider taking a step back and having a conversation with them. It's the best way to understand what's going on with your child and put the pieces together. The benefits of parents helping their child with their homework When your child feels comfortable doing homework without you hovering over them, he or she may enjoy it and feel more comfortable in school. Helping your child with homework may make the learning experience more enjoyable. Homework, especially at a younger age, can be boring and uninspiring. Having you help your child with homework can provide positive reinforcement for him or her to work hard and succeed. Helping your child with homework encourages your child to learn at a young age, as well. By encouraging and helping him or her, your child will get the most out of the experience. Homework helps children improve their social skills. Helping your child with homework may encourage him or her to converse with other people more effectively, which will help your child succeed in school. The responsibilities of the parent as a homework helper Do not read the text of the homework. Just show them how to read it. Do not ask your child how they know. They have been working on the same material all year. Do not make a funny face when your child makes a mistake. No one likes a critical parent. If your child gets angry or emotional, say, "Good job!" and quickly change the topic. Tell your child when they have done a good job and praise them as much as possible. Leave instructions for the next day. If your child gets angry, it's best not to try to reason with him. Be firm and say something like "Homework is important and I want you to do your best. I'm your parent and you should respect my authority.” Saying no to homework can be an important tool. But, in some cases, it's necessary. Conclusion Homework is an essential part of learning, but it’s a lot of work for parents. Make sure you find ways to make the work manageable for both you and your children. Taking time to communicate with your child about the homework helps make it a successful and productive process for all of you. Meredith Lariviere, Ed.D., teaches middle and high school English and has a master’s degree in reading education. She works in the Chicago Public School system as a teacher. She lives in the South Shore community on the city’s south side.

What parents can do to help their child with his or her homework

From a parent’s point of view, homework is a time-suck, a source of stress and frustration, and sometimes a source of arguments between the parent and child. But when parents can acknowledge the need to break the cycle and adopt some of these tactics, it can help them be a little less exhausted and In the long run, the children will reap the benefits.

1) Schedule a set time each day where your child does his or her homework.

2) Offer rewards for completing tasks, such as an extra hour of screen time or a favorite snack after they finish their work.

3) Checking frequently with your child about what they learned that day; ask them about what they’re doing and why they’re doing it.

How to be friends with your kids?

4) No matter how busy you are, set aside some time to spend with your children on the weekends. Make an effort to play with them, or have them spend time with you while you make dinner or do other household chores.

5) Make time for meaningful conversations. Let your children know that you love them and that you want to spend time with them.

These tips can be extremely helpful when you’re trying to help your children with their homework. Be sure to speak with a professional if you’re having difficulties managing your schedule. There’s a balance to be found between homework and life.

More Ways Parents Can Help Homework

Sometimes it’s hard to make homework enjoyable, especially if you’re always stressed about it.

Why your kid is annoyed with you?

Not all homework assignments are created equally. Some tasks will take very little time to complete while others will be more complex. When children are doing work that is beyond their current ability level, parents need to be patient and firm.

Ensure that your child isn’t under any pressure to accomplish too much and too soon. Many kids resist asking their parents for help,” says Mahoney.

And if your child is struggling with their homework, instead of picking apart their schoolwork and harshly criticizing their work, consider taking a step back and having a conversation with them. It’s the best way to understand what’s going on with your child and put the pieces together.

The benefits of parents helping their child with their homework

When your child feels comfortable doing homework without you hovering over them, he or she may enjoy it and feel more comfortable in school.

Helping your child with homework may make the learning experience more enjoyable.

Homework, especially at a younger age, can be boring and uninspiring. Having you help your child with homework can provide positive reinforcement for him or her to work hard and succeed.

Helping your child with homework encourages your child to learn at a young age, as well. By encouraging and helping him or her, your child will get the most out of the experience.

Homework helps children improve their social skills. Helping your child with homework may encourage him or her to converse with other people more effectively, which will help your child succeed in school.

The responsibilities of the parent as a homework helper

Do not read the text of the homework. Just show them how to read it.

Do not ask your child how they know. They have been working on the same material all year.

Do not make a funny face when your child makes a mistake. No one likes a critical parent.

If your child gets angry or emotional, say, “Good job!” and quickly change the topic.

Tell your child when they have done a good job and praise them as much as possible.

Leave instructions for the next day.

If your child gets angry, it’s best not to try to reason with him. Be firm and say something like “Homework is important and I want you to do your best. I’m your parent and you should respect my authority.”

Saying no to homework can be an important tool. But, in some cases, it’s necessary.

Conclusion

Homework is an essential part of learning, but it’s a lot of work for parents. Make sure you find ways to make the work manageable for both you and your children. Taking time to communicate with your child about the homework helps make it a successful and productive process for all of you.

Meredith Lariviere, Ed.D., teaches middle and high school English and has a master’s degree in reading education. She works in the Chicago Public School system as a teacher. She lives in the South Shore community on the city’s south side.

Leave a Comment